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CHM 1025 - Chemistry

Frequently Asked Questions  

Course Placement and Academic Plan

  1. What is CHM 1025, Modern Chemistry?
  2. I took chemistry in high school, why do I have to take CHM 1025 before taking CHM 1045, College Chemistry I?
  3. Does CHM 1025 have any pre-requisites?
  4. Does CHM 1025 have any co-requisites?
  5. Does CHM 1025 count as a general education science credit?
  6. I recently took chemistry in high school and feel that I have a proficient level of knowledge to take CHM 1045, College Chemistry I.  Is there any way that I can skip CHM 1025 and go straight into CHM 1045?
  7. How do I take the CHM 1045 College Chemistry I placement test?
  8. Is there anything that I can do to prepare to take the CHM 1045 College Chemistry I placement test?
  9. What information will be provided on the CHM 1045 College Chemistry I placement test?
  10. Can my instructor sign a waiver for me to go into CHM 1045 College Chemistry I because I took Advanced Placement Chemistry in high school or because I already have a degree from my country and I know chemistry?
  11. I did not pass CHM 1025 lecture but I passed the CHM 1025 lab, do I have to retake both the lecture and the laboratory?
  12. What is the next course I should take after CHM 1025 Modern Chemistry?
  13. What should I know if I am considering taking a chemistry course during the summer?
  14. What should I know about developing my class schedule when I take Organic Chemistry?
  15. What are the pre-requisites for CHM 2210 Organic Chemistry I?
  16. Should I take my Organic classes here or at the university to which I am transferring?
  1. What is CHM 1025, Modern Chemistry?
    This course is the pre-requisite for CHM 1045, College Chemistry I.  This course covers an elementary treatment of mathematical tools of the chemist, atomic theory, periodic arrangement of the elements, chemical bonding, nomenclature of compounds, chemical reactions and gas laws.  This chemistry course is designed for students with no chemistry background. 
  2. I took chemistry in high school, why do I have to take CHM 1025 before taking CHM 1045, College Chemistry I?
    CHM 1045 College Chemistry I moves at a very brisk pace and assumes that a student has recently taken CHM 1025.  CHM 1045 expands on many of the topics covered in CHM 1025.  Success in College Chemistry I is dependent on a current working knowledge of the chemistry topics covered in CHM 1025.  Often, when a student has taken chemistry in high school, their retrieval of chemistry knowledge is not as proficient as is required for success in CHM 1045.
  3. Does CHM 1025 have any pre-requisites?
    Yes, college level reading, writing and math skills.  You should not take CHM 1025 if you have not successfully completed all the prep classes.  CHM 1025 requires the ability to manipulate basic algebraic equations. 
  4. Does CHM 1025 have any co-requisites?
    Yes, CHM 1025 L Modern Chemistry Laboratory is the co-requisite for CHM 1025.  Laboratory techniques and skills are essential component of chemistry.  Many concepts covered in the lecture course are reinforced through hands-on experimentation in the lab.  In addition, success in subsequent chemistry courses, particularly chemistry lab courses, is based on knowledge gained in the CHM 1025 laboratory. 
  5. Does CHM 1025 count as a general education science credit?
    No, CHM 1025 does not count as general education science credit.  CHM 1025 counts only as elective credit.
  6. I recently took chemistry in high school and feel that I have a proficient level of knowledge to take CHM 1045, College Chemistry I.  Is there any way that I can skip CHM 1025 and go straight into CHM 1045?
    Yes, there is a College Chemistry I placement test.  The test consists of 30 multiple choice questions.  The test is based on the CHM 1025 Student Learning Outcomes (please see Course Links for a link to the CHM 1025 Student Learning Outcomes).    A passing score is achieving a 70% or higher on the placement test.  A student who scores a 70% or higher on the placement test, can go directly into CHM 1045 without taking CHM 1025.
  7. How do I take the CHM 1045 College Chemistry I placement test?
    Each campus has a designated testing center.  You should contact the testing center and make an appointment to take the test.  The test center will score your placement test and enter that your score into the HCC system.  If you scored a 70% or higher, the system should allow you to register for CHM 1045 without requiring CHM 1025 as a pre-requisite.
  8. Is there anything that I can do to prepare to take the CHM 1045 College Chemistry I placement test?
    Yes.  You should read through the CHM 1025 Student Learning Outcomes located ___________) and review the material that is covered by the Student Learning Outcomes.  The library has chemistry textbooks on reserve that can be used to review and there are many online chemistry websites.
  9. What information will be provided on the CHM 1045 College Chemistry I placement test?
    A periodic table is provided, as well as a table of formulas and conversion factors including the temperature conversion equations, the equation to calculate heat and the mole conversion factor are provided.  A non-programmable scientific calculator may be used on the test. 
  10. Can my instructor sign a waiver for me to go into CHM 1045 College Chemistry I because I took Advanced Placement Chemistry in high school or because I already have a degree from my country and I know chemistry?
    No. Students must take CHM 1025 as a pre-requisite to CHM 1045 unless they earn a passing score on the CHM 1045 College Chemistry I placement test.
  11. I did not pass CHM 1025 lecture but I passed the CHM 1025 lab, do I have to retake both the lecture and the laboratory?
    No.  If you successfully completed the CHM 1025 L laboratory, you can retake the CHM 1025 lecture without taking the laboratory again.
  12. What is the next course I should take after CHM 1025 Modern Chemistry?
    Normally, the next course in the chemistry sequence is CHM 1045 and CHM 1045 L (College Chemistry I Lecture and Laboratory).  Some of the AS degrees only require that you take CHM 1025 for the degree requirement.   See your instructor or advisor for specific guidance. You can access this site for an advising guide: /ssem/student-services/advising-guides.aspxNOTE:  CHM 1045 has an additional pre-requisite of MAC 1105.
  13. What should I know if I am considering taking a chemistry course during the summer?
    Chemistry is a very intensive course.  You should carefully consider whether or not to take chemistry in the summer.  The course requires a substantial amount of out-of-class work and study.  In addition, the laboratory must be taken as a co-requisite and also requires a substantial amount of time outside of class.  It is not recommended that you take a chemistry course while you are taking any other courses during the summer or if you are working full-time.  Since the summer moves at such a fast pace, daily work is essential to be successful in the course. 
  14. What should I know about developing my class schedule when I take Organic Chemistry?
    Organic Chemistry is a 4 credit lecture and has a co-requisite 1 credit laboratory.   It is advisable to try to take Organic Chemistry with lighter classes.  If science and math classes are all that you have left to take, try to take Organic with only one other science with lab class or math class.  The time commitment for successful completion of Organic Chemistry is intense.
  15. What are the pre-requisites for CHM 2210 Organic Chemistry I?
    The pre-requisite for CHM 2210 is successful completion of CHM 1046 and CHM 1046 L (College Chemistry II lecture and laboratory).
  16. Should I take my Organic classes here or at the university to which I am transferring?
    Assuming that the university shares an articulation agreement with HCC, it is best to take the courses here.

Classroom Performance

  1. I am having trouble grasping some of the concepts. Where can I get help?
  2. How many hours outside of class should I plan for the CHM 1025 course each week?
  3. What strategies are suggested for being successful in this course?
  4. I do not test well. What should I do?
  5. Being in the classroom does not seem to help me learn the material. What are my options?
  6. I am going to a tutor and I really understand it when I am with my tutor, but then I fail the tests. What is going on?
  7. I understand everything in class, but when I go home I feel totally lost. Why is that?
  8. I do all of my homework and it just does not seem to be helping. What am I doing wrong?
  9. How can a study group help me?
  10. How can I form a study group?
  1. I am having trouble grasping some of the concepts. Where can I get help?
    Check with your instructor during her/his office hours. If you need additional help, you may benefit from a visit to the tutorial center on your campus. You can go to any campus to get free tutoring help. You can also access live 24/7 help on www.smarthinking.com (which you can access through Hawknet using your student name and id.) A complete list of tutorial resources can be found on:  
  2. How many hours outside of class should I plan for the CHM 1025 course each week?
    You should dedicate a minimum of four to six plus hours of study to the lecture course per week (this does not include preparing for quizzes and exams OR lab work).
    If your foundation is not strong, you may find yourself spending the hours at the upper range of this scale.
  3. What strategies are suggested for being successful in this course?
    It is critical that you stay on top of the material and work as many practice problems as possible.  The learning experience provided by solving problems is essential to mastering the concepts and successfully completing the course.  One way to stay on top of the material is to regularly attend the Supplemental Leader (SL) sessions that are available in the Academic Success Center on each campus.  These sessions provide you with scheduled study time to review the chemistry material covered each week.
    In addition, class attendance is critical.
  4. I do not test well. What should I do?
    Speak with your instructor who may offer you some study tips and other ways to enhance your test performance. If you have an unusually high anxiety level, you may want to speak with a counselor on your campus who can provide additional options.
  5. Being in the classroom does not seem to help me learn the material. What are my options?
    Go to /academics/qep/MAC1105.aspx  On this site there are several additional resources including tips on test anxiety and time management. Make use of the CD available in all new texts or through your campus library. There are video lessons and example problems that you can pause and review as many times as necessary.
  6. I am going to a tutor and I really understand it when I am with my tutor, but then I fail the tests. What is going on?
    It may be that you are relying on the thinking process or questioning process of your tutor rather than learning to ask the questions or process the problem on your own. The tutor should be used as a tool AFTER you have completed your homework so you can focus on specific points of difficulty. You should then follow up by making notes, reviewing them, and regularly returning to the type of questions that challenged you.
  7. I understand everything in class, but when I go home I feel totally lost. Why is that?
    Your instructor has done the problems many times and knows how she wants to guide you through it. It is the difference between watching someone drive and then actually getting behind the wheel yourself. Not only do you have to turn the wheel, but you have to think about where you want to go and what potential hazards there are that you need to avoid. You need to make sure you allow plenty of time to practice the skills learned in class.
  8. I do all of my homework and it just does not seem to be helping. What am I doing wrong?
    There are several things that may be happening. One of the best things you can do for yourself it to check your answers with the answers in the back of your text. (But do not make the common mistake of completing your homework with the solutions manual open.) The greatest learning can occur when you make a mistake and sit down to truly understand for yourself what the error was and why you made it. If you are unable to find the cause of the error, seek outside help either from your instructor, a free on campus tutor, smarthinking.com, or a student study group. It is important to know when you have made a mistake and it is equally valuable for you to put forth the effort to discover the solution for yourself. Just completing your homework is not sufficient; you should continually follow up by studying. Please check with your instructor or for more information, go to /academics/qep/MAC1105.aspx  and check out the section on study skills and time management.
  9. How can a study group help me?
    Studies have shown that an appropriate group size (no more than four) has the potential to improve your class average by up to two letter grades. You need to have consistent and equal participation for the study group to reach its full potential. A good study group can help you
  10. How can I form a study group?
    You can ask your instructor to help you form a study group, or find classmates with whom you feel comfortable while doing work in class.

Class Tools

  1. How important is it that I purchase a scientific calculator?
  2. Should  I purchase a graphing calculator?
  3. Do I need to buy a book?
  1. How important is it that I purchase a scientific calculator?
    It is required that you have a scientific calculator with exponent functions for this course.  You will not be able to successfully complete many of the types of problems without a scientific calculator. 
  2. Should  I purchase a graphing calculator?
    It is not required for any of the chemistry courses; however if you plan to continue on to any type of Calculus or Statistics, many instructors will require you to use one. It is a good idea to learn to navigate the graphing calculator prior to entering these courses, and you will probably find it is an excellent aid in chemistry and College Algebra as well.
  3. Do I need to buy a book?
    Yes. Your book is an invaluable resource for all of your chemistry courses. All chemistry texts come with additional student tools such as the answers to homework problems, worked-out examples, website addresses for tutorials or a solutions manual. You will also have homework assignments based upon your text book.  Certain textbooks also come packaged with online homework system codes that are required by many faculty.
    Many textbooks are now also available as ebooks.  An ebook is sometimes a less expensive alternative to a hard copy of the book.  Most campuses also have the textbook on reserve in the library.  If possible, having access to the textbook at home is optimal.

Other

  1. Where can I go if I am just feeling overwhelmed either inside or outside the classroom?
  1. Where can I go if I am just feeling overwhelmed either inside or outside the classroom?
    Try some tips for time management /academics/qep/MAC1105.aspx  or seek counseling on your campus. Contact Student Support Services: 813-253-7507 (Dale Mabry), 813-253-7629 (Ybor), 813-253-7810 (Brandon), 813-757-2212 (Plant City).

Modern Chemistry Gateway Student Learning Outcomes
CONDENSED FORM—Revised Summer 2010

  1. Students will be able to outline the steps of the scientific method and will be able to evaluate whether the steps of the scientific method have been properly followed when given a description of an experiment.
  2. Students will be able to properly report measurements using the SI System, perform calculations, including unit conversions, to the correct number of significant figures/digits and evaluate the precision and accuracy of a group of measurements.
  3. Students will be able to describe the physical states of matter, classify matter and distinguish between physical and chemical properties and changes including demonstrating knowledge of the property of density by solving density problems and being able to interpret and apply their results (i.e. will an object float, etc.).
  4. Students will be able to apply the Law of Conservation of Energy to calculate the amount of energy released or absorbed in a chemical reaction or physical change and identify the change as endothermic or exothermic.
  5. Students will be able to describe the structure of the atom including writing atomic and electron configuration notations and relate the structure of the atom to the organization of the periodic table (groups and periods) and be able to compute/calculate the average atomic mass for an element when provided with the isotopic masses and percent abundances of the composite elemental isotopes.
  6. Students will be able to write a chemical formula based on an IUPAC name, or to determine an IUPAC name based upon a chemical formula, for inorganic compounds, use the formula to draw the Lewis structure for a compound and predict the molecular geometry, as well as, to differentiate between ionic and covalent bonding by evaluating the chemical formulas of compounds.
  7. Students will be able to solve mole relationship problems using the periodic table (mole conversions, percentage composition, and empirical/molecular formulas, and molarity) and balance chemical equations to solve stoichiometry problems.

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