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01_Compound_microscope.gif Ocular with ocular (eyepiece) lens (10X) Body tube Head Arm Rotating nosepiece High (dry) power (40X) objective lens High (oil) power (100X) objective lens Low power (04X) objective lens Fine adjustment knob Coarse adjustment knob Coarse adjustment knob Base Light source Base Adjustment knobs for the mechanical stage Stage Stage Slide clip on the mechanical stage Slide clip on the mechanical stage Mechanical stage Condenser Medium power (10X) objective lens

 

02_Compound_microscope.gif Ocular with ocular (eyepiece) lens (10X) Body tube Head Arm Nosepiece Low power (04X) objective lens Medium power (10X) objective lens High (dry) power (40X) objective lens High (oil) power (100X) objective lens Arm Fine adjustment knob Coarse adjustment knob Coarse adjustment knob Substage light adjustment Condenser Diaphragm Light source Power switch Base Stage Stage Mechanical stage Slide clip

 

03_Compound_microscope.gif Ocular with ocular (eyepiece) (10X) lens Body tube Head Nosepiece Medium power (10X) objective lens Low power (04X) objective lens High (oil) power (100X) objective lens High (dry) power (40X) objective lens Slide clip Slide clip Section of the mechanical stage Section of the mechanical stage Adjustment knob for the mechanical stage Stage Condenser Light source Power switch Base Substage light adjustment knob

 

04_Compound_microscope.gif Slide clip Condenser Adjustment knobs for mechanical stage Adjustment knob for substage light Coarse adjustment knob Diaphragm Light source Stage Part of mechanical stage High (dry) power (40X) objective lens High (oil) power (100X) objective lens Low power (04X) objective lens Medium power (10X) objective lens Fine adjustment knob

 

A compound_microscope is a microscope with more than one lens. On a compound microscope, one lens is near the eye and is therefore termed the ocular lens. Other lenses are positioned on a rotating structure known as the nosepiece, which allows them to be moved in and out of viewing position. These lenses are termed objective lenses. Some compound microscopes have two oculars and are therefore called stereomicroscopes (binocular_microscopes).

Most of our microscopes have four objectives: low (4x), medium (100X), high dry (400X), and oil_immersion (1,000 with oil). When you look into an ocular, you will see a built-in pointer. If you are using a stereomicroscope, only one of the two oculars will have a pointer.

Some microscopes are used for viewing prepared microslides, but some (called dissecting_stereomicroscopes) are made for observing objects in a dish of water, or organisms that are being dissected.

Magnification is computed by multiplying the power of the ocular (usually 10x, but not always) times the power of the objective in use at the moment. Remember: "ocular times objective = magnification".